Wednesday, September 04, 2019

Council Rock (Pieces of the Puzzle)

Art Duval Researches the origin of “Council Rock” found in Awenda Park area.  


Following local rumours about a rock relating to Treaty 5, also known as the Penetang purchase has led to research that will be presented at the October 9th Meeting.

Art Duval, a local researcher, will be delving into his discoveries about the history and origin of the inscribed rock found in Awenda Park. 







The questions he addresses are: 

Is there a rock with names on it that relate to the Penetang Purchase?
Is it located in a logical place of historical significance?
Are the described names historicaly accurate?
What was the historical significance of the inscription?
What does it represent?
Who made it?
How was it made?
What does the archaeology say?

Please join us while we explore these questions with Art  at the North Simcoe Recreation Center in Midland at 7PM on Wednesday October 9th.

The public is welcome to join us at no charge.


9 comments:

Unknown said...

Is there minutes of this meeting? I would love any information. Thank you.
Haley Geddes
Thunder Beach Tiny

Art Duval said...

Hi Haley, I did the presentation and I have a blog about it. https://www.pipesmokeofthepast.com/post/mysteries-of-huronia-council-rock-part1
I will be adding information to it as I go in subsequent posts.

Unknown said...

Thanks Art

Unknown said...

Any chance you could share with me where in Awenda this rock is? Please?

John Raynor said...

Unfortunately, both Awenda Park and the local First Nation wishes that the location remain confidential.

Unknown said...

I was at the library in Midland and found very interesting material regarding Council Rock
Please contact me.
I'm sad to hear this because the park is public. I can go myself and look, but I would prefer to go through someone who knows.

Unknown said...

I was at the library in Midland and found very interesting material regarding Council Rock
Please contact me.
I'm sad to hear this because the park is public. I can go myself and look, but I would prefer to go thru someone who knows.
haley_geddes@hotmail.com

John Raynor said...

Yes, the park is public and there are numerous archaeological sites within the 5000 acres controlled by the park. The park does not mark the location of any of these sites in an effort to protect them from looting or vandalism. The reason for not wanting to encourage any further public access to the rock is a concern over intentional or accidental damage to the inscription on the rock by those who visit the site and that some consider the site as a sacred site and do not want to see it used as a tourist destination.

Unknown said...

I totally understand. I live here though and I have located some historical data I wish to share. The email on here is not my correct email